Russia Would Just Love to Nuke Sweden

Discussion in 'The Far Abroad' started by Drutten, Jan 12, 2014.

  1. Drutten

    Drutten Collegiate Secretary (10th class)

    Joined:
    May 17, 2013
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    45
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Sweden
    Also, a very real Russian submarine was discovered off Sweden a few months ago. Turns out it sank 100 years ago. It was an interesting find regardless as it belongs to one of the earliest proper types of submarines that saw Russian (Imperial as it were) service.

    In this case, the military didn't say diddly squat about it though. This piece of marine archaeology was a private initiative and the guys who found it had been looking for this particular submarine for quite a while, since its sinking during WW1 was rather well-known and records of its demise (including rough information about where it sank) were publicly available. They knew very well that media would lose interest quickly had they made that clear from the beginning though, so for a little while they put out cryptic comments suggesting it was somehow related to later, more well-known submarine dramas. This approach proved successful as media went absolutely crazy with it as expected, its journalists doing next to no own research about it (which had it been done would instantly have led them onto that particular 100-year old submarine).

    Some people (belonging to the same bunch that have entertained all the earlier stories) later suggested that it was all in fact a Russian "psychological operation" designed to cast doubt over the aforementioned later submarine allegations, since one of the guys on this expedition was in fact a Russian from a Russian Navy-related museum. The farce thus continues - everything has to be about Russians with ulterior motives, everything, no matter what it is.

    Now, it was no wonder that the media craziness eventually led to a lot of sarcastic remarks from the Russian side. I mean, who can blame them? But interestingly, the first thing that popped into people's heads was that it was a cunning Russian plan to begin with, not that it was the fault of our media and the Swedish wreck hunters who have been known for ages for being notorious attention seekers (putting out crazy stories about sunken UFOs and what not for years, not kidding). Nope, the paranoiacs simply pointed to the Russian museum guy who joined the expedition and that was all it took to "prove" Putins hand in it.

    Thus the farce continues.
  2. Drutten

    Drutten Collegiate Secretary (10th class)

    Joined:
    May 17, 2013
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    45
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Sweden
    And just like that, now Swedish Radio reports that the sounds picked up by Swedish sonars during the 2014 "submarine hunt" were sounds emitted by our own vessels:
    Suspected submarine sound came from a Swedish source
    http://sverigesradio.se/sida/artikel.aspx?programid=83&artikel=6451214

    So that leaves what, exactly? The infamous photos were eventually shown to be of a civilian vessel, the sightings of a very distinct submarine were confirmed to be one, albeit from Germany, taking part in NATO exercises nearby (that Sweden were also part of, as I mentioned, oh boy neutrality)... The "Spetsnaz frogman" was an elderly Swedish fisherman and now the smoking gun stuff picked up by our sensors turns out to be from own junk. Great.

    The article also mentions another submarine that was spotted in the Stockholm archipelago in the spring of 2015, which the Navy said was a "foreign intruder" with reports being filed and forwarded to the government et cetera. That one was German as well, it now turns out.

    Oh, and to jump back to the Ardglass trawler affair and the UK. Just the other day an actual Russian sub was spotted in international waters off Britain, heading south through the English channel. This submarine was travelling in surfaced mode as is customary during these passages, and it was accompanied by a rather conspicuous tugboat. This passage had also, again as customary been announced beforehand to the UK and France, as it was a simple routine transfer from the Baltic to the Black Sea.

    But the UK MoD went into the usual overdrive and published nonsense such as "locating this submarine was a combined effort with NATO allies and shadowing such units is routine activity for the Royal Navy" and "this shows that the Navy is maintaining a vigilant watch in international and territorial waters to keep Britain safe and protect us from potential threats.”

    Brilliant, I guess esteemed NATO allies provided the Royal Navy with, um, a pair of binoculars and/or a particularly effective desk worker who made sure to forward the relevant papers to the guys off the coast. What the free and independent British press published about the "incident" is better left unsaid...

    One recurring thing I see in these so-called "incidents" is that the MoDs of Western European countries are bullshitting to a degree that would be fit for North Korea, and it's a particular flavor of bullshitting that is very interesting to observe and analyze. Lying by omission is the default approach in all our dealings with everything these days, and it goes a long way describing this too.

    Apart from all of these examples that we've gone through at length in this very thread, I have another recent one in mind.

    Just last year there was a routine inspection of the Nord Stream pipeline in the Baltic taking place, conducted by Nord Stream AG with a ROV. This inspection team found another ROV drifting, seemingly dead near the pipeline and quickly identified it as a German-made "SeaFox" de-mining robot. This prompted Nord Stream AG to swiftly alert the Swedish Coast Guard as it was within the Swedish "exclusive economic zone" and since these SeaFox vehicles are typically armed with an explosive charge (for kamikaze-style demining).

    The Swedish Coast Guard, upon receiving this information then in turn contacted the Swedish Navy and the Swedish Navy subsequently put out a press release about their intention to identify and neutralize this "unknown vehicle" of "unknown origin". Over the following couple of days, the Swedish Navy kept releasing vague statements about how they have "approached the unknown vehicle" and later on how they've suddenly decided to dramatically "destroy it" and so on. Wow, you guys are tough!

    All these statements were seized upon by the media and the obvious "Russian trail" was all over the place. The Navy didn't mind a bit, as expected. Shortly thereafter, pundits and think tanks were talking on TV and writing in newspapers about how it could be part of an evil Russian plan to sabotage the pipeline with a ROV and then blame Sweden, or some such. A casus belli, because that dastardly Putin fellow is obviously never up to any good, his mind solely revolving around creative ways to kickstart a war.

    The Navy kept saying nil during all this time.

    Then, the Navy finally said that they had, no doubt with admirable resolve blown up the "unknown craft" and that they would now vigilantly proceed with analyzing its remains to determine what this "mystery object" was and where its origins lie. The speculation thus continued.

    Another couple of weeks pass, and the Navy then releases a statement concluding that it was a German-made SeaFox (finally!) and that it was their own (one of two or some such that they had at the time) that they had accidently lost just a little while earlier in the same area.

    See what I'm getting at? The Navy obviously knew from day one what it was, still we got this smoke and mirrors crap. The Brits did the same with the trawler incident off Ireland - obviously they knew it was their own submarine, but why bother saying anything, let the media go wild with everything "Russian" for a good while and then discreetly come clean long afterwards (since we're the good guys and we do come clean... Eventually, once it's forgotten and the political/public impact has been irreversibly assured).

    It's great.
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2016

Share This Page