Putin clamping down on media installing puppet as media director of Lenta.ru

Discussion in 'The Media and Russia' started by john smith, Mar 12, 2014.

  1. john smith

    john smith Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    12-Mar-2014 Russian News Site Editor Removed, Prompting Uproar From Staff
    RUSSIA – The article below appeared in today’s English language edition of RIA Novosti.

    MOSCOW, March 12 (RIA Novosti) – The editor-in-chief of the popular Russian news website Lenta.ru was relieved of her post Wednesday, prompting staff there to complain that their editorial independence was being stifled.

    Galina Timchenko has been replaced with Alexei Goreslavsky, the media holding’s deputy director general of communications, according to a brief statement posted on the publication’s website.

    An open letter signed by a group of about 70 Lenta.ru journalists says the replacement is an attempt to put pressure on an independent media outlet in breach of Russian law, “not an ordinary reshuffle.”

    Yelizaveta Surganova, an editor at the website’s Internet and Media news section, said many journalists have already decided to resign.

    “I know that some have already tendered their resignation, while others have openly stated on social networks that they are not going to work with this new editor-in-chief,” she said.

    Goreslavsky has a reputation as a pro-Kremlin figure.

    Timchenko had worked for Lenta.ru since it was founded in 1999, and was appointed editor-in-chief about ten years ago.

    The decision to replace her was taken by Alexander Mamut, owner of the united company Afisha-Rambler-SUP that owns Lenta.ru, according to the statement.

    Published 14:15


    http://retwa.com/home.cfm?articleId=16182
  2. Drutten

    Drutten Collegiate Secretary (10th class)

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    Putin? I honestly doubt he's even mildly interested in such things. If one were to assess Putins personal stance on journalism and the medias in general, based on what he's said and what actions he's taken it seems that they are nothing but petty peripheral affairs and that he couldn't be less bothered by them, let alone personally involved in regulating matters.

    Ask me and I'd say that what caused this was the system, more specifically Roskomnadzor and the ease with which they can revoke publishing and broadcasting rights. Lenta had received a few warnings due to some (in their eyes, at least) controversial publications, and Lentas owner decided to sack the chief editor fearing the loss of profit should she continue annoying Rozkomnadzor, putting in her place a more reliable figure in this context.

    At the end of the day, it's not a simple matter of cui bono, and thus one cannot place blame as if it was. However, the self-regulatory nature of it all works toward that end anyway. One could definitely call it a systemic failure and perhaps a glaring symptom of the post-Soviet remnant if you will, something that needs to be worked out somehow but that might not be fully until a whole lot of key people are six feet under. People around and below Putin are far more conservative (even backwards) and nitpicking than the man himself, and these pissy attitudes permeate a huge chunk of the Russian power structure.

    I guess that in a sense one blame the Putin system, though I'd say a far more fair epithet would be the Russian system or something along those lines.

    I am however not too worried about this because I honestly think the apparent rise of such "crackdowns" as of late are simply terminal spasms. It's going to backfire one way or another, and you'll keep seeing plenty of investigative and objective journalism coming from these and other outlets regardless. As has been the case for every prior "crackdown", which all instigated an uproar in domestic and international media but which in time largely led back to status quo ante.

    Far more worrying is the recent blocking of certain websites by questionable court orders. I couldn't care less about Kasparov and Navalny (the main subjects to the recent blockings), but such actions are far too China-esque for my taste. However, as in the case above, I believe such initiatives will too die out sooner or later.

    In the system there is a fear of letting liberal forces all loose again, this fear is not entirely without merit but these days it's definitely overinflated and the legitimacy of this fear shrinks by the day. It's slowly becoming an anachronism and they will realise this.
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2014
  3. Drutten

    Drutten Collegiate Secretary (10th class)

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    The Kasparov/Navalny internet blacklist thingy I criticised has now been revoked, it seems. Not surprised.

    ...Though I am sure that Kasparov will whine about this on Twitter for years to come.
  4. john smith

    john smith Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    Nonsense any serious opposition efforts to Putin's stranglehold on power are immediately censored or banned that has become tiresome being a Putin PR spokesman with excuse after excuse when something bad occurs in Russia like the latest annexation of Ukraine, lack of press freedom and political opposition, human rights, inequality, corruption, etc who is more of a dictator than a democrat that are issues never raised or countered by Russian bloggers.
  5. PCO VolgaTrader

    PCO VolgaTrader Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    What's the worst media distortion concerning the Donbass rebellion?
  6. Carlo

    Carlo Ship Secretary (11th class)

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    Hard to say, there are so many! I guess it is to call them "terrorists", absurd considering that they have only attacked legitimate military targets* in the region they defend, but usually only the Ukrainian press refers to them like this. I still haven't seem the Western mass media call them "terrorists".
    [*the downing of MH17 is still a very dubious matter and we still have no evidence whatsoever that it was the rebels in Donetsk who did it]

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