How To Raise Russian TFR?

Discussion in 'Russian Society' started by Valeria, May 20, 2013.

  1. Valeria

    Valeria Gubernial Secretary (12th class)

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    4
    Gender:
    Female
    From current rates to about 3 children per Russian woman on average? Any ideas? I'm talking most of Russia in general. Meaning both rural areas and urban areas. Or is that a pipe dream?

    Like can TFR be raised among many Russians despite differences in SES (Socio-Economic Status), Religion, Urban/Rural and stuff? Or is it better to just concentrate on certain groups?

    Natalist subsidies and policies don't work in developed countries because people are stubborn, and individualistic. If they want children, they want it desperately. If they don't, they don't want it at all.
  2. AKarlin

    AKarlin Generalissimo Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    39
    Yes, that's a pipe dream.

    I mean it's not a 100% impossible scenario; plenty of industrialized countries exceed 3 during the 1950's and 1960's. But not since then. There are no grounds whatsoever to think it would be.
  3. Morgoth

    Morgoth Office Registrar (13th class)

    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    13
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Australia
    Although I do not think that it is possible for Russia to raise its TFR to 3, no western nation on earth has a TFR even above 2.2* it is certainly possible to increase the TFR to perhaps a maximum of 1.9 - 2 given the current societal conditions prevailing in Russia.


    * Although Israel has a TFR of 3 or so, it is a unique case in that it combines a modern society with traditional values resulting in a high fertility rate, it therefore cannot be compared to other western nations as Israel is completely unique in its combination of a well educated populace with a highly religious one.
  4. Valeria

    Valeria Gubernial Secretary (12th class)

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    4
    Gender:
    Female
    Alright. How about raising the Russian TFR to 2 then? Any ideas?
  5. Valeria

    Valeria Gubernial Secretary (12th class)

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    4
    Gender:
    Female
    True that it's a combination between education and religion. Israel is also different because it's surrounded by hostile Arab Spring turned into Arab Winter countries such as Libya, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan. They need the extra babies to fight for them.

    The agents depicted in the MSM as “freedom fighters!” are not really agitators for Western secular liberal “Bomb them for democratic capitalism!”, but in reality are militant Islamic rebels who are taking over the more moderate Arab rulers.
  6. Николас/Nicholas

    Николас/Nicholas Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

    Joined:
    May 20, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    I don't think that Israel's high TFR is due to Israeli mothers wanting to breed more soldiers, but instead the high fertility rates of the ultra-orthodox Jewish and a lesser extent Muslim Arab minorities. I think economic prosperity and greater opportunities economically will help Russia's TFR. Looking at the map here of Russian natural population growth
    [​IMG]
    and here of births per 1000 people http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d1/Russia_birth_rates_2012.PNG the oil rich Tyumen Oblast (which has a GNP per capita 7 times the national average) and the even more oil rich Khanty-Mansi and Yamalo-Nemets autonomous okrugs really stick out (the dark green areas just east of the Urals). And all these territories are over 70% ethnic Russian and Ukrainian, so its not like all these native tribespeople are having all the children. It will be interesting to see a graph comparing the TFR and GDP per capita of all the Slavic majority federal subjects of Russia.

    I also read somewhere that childcare/early childhood education is very expensive and tough to get into in Russia, or atleast Moscow. Maybe changes in that area might have a real impact

Share This Page