Get a Residency Permit (Вид на жительство иространного гражданира)!

Discussion in 'Samovar Teahouse' started by Moscow Exile, May 11, 2013.

  1. Moscow Exile

    Moscow Exile Ship Secretary (11th class)

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    That's what I would advise anyone wishing to live and work in Russia for a number of years.

    I have a "permanent" permit, although it has to be re-registered every 5-years. Before being granted the permanent one, I had to apply for a temporary one that was valid for 3 years. I've had a residency permit for 9 years now.

    I never suffered a culture shock when I first came here and have no intentions of leaving this country. So why not opt for full citizenship?

    Truth is, I simply didn't change my citizenship so as to ensure that any offspring of mine would have dual nationality. However, I shouldn't imagine that my wife wishes to bear yet another child; my 3 children have both British and Russian citizenship, so why not go the whole hog now and become a Russian citizen? After all, I have only returned to the UK five times for very brief visits over the past 20 years and am not particularly enamoured with the place.

    I guess I just hang on to my British citizenship for the same reason that I wished my children to have it: more flexibility and less hassle visa-wise when travelling. For example, last November,we all went to visit Euro-Disney in France and there was no necessity, of course, for my children and me to apply for a French visa. After suggesting to my children that we visit Disney-world in Florida, they were delighted to learn that because of their British citizenship, they needn't apply for a US visitor's visa.

    Problem is, though, that my wife only has Russian citizenship. She could travel to France with us without a visa last November because she is the spouse of an EU citizen. However, this rule does not apply if she wishes to travel to the UK with me: in that case she has to get a visitor's visa - just another irritating example of British EU exceptionalism and bureaucracy.

    Well, if we go to Florida, we can always leave her here, I suppose.

    ;)

    Now how the hell do I remedy that error in the thread title caused by my pressing the Latin key for "H" that has resulted instead of the Cyrillic key for "H" and which has resulted in "гражданира"?

    :mad:
  2. Hero of Crappy Town

    Hero of Crappy Town Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    Can you not yourself be a dual citizen?
  3. Moscow Exile

    Moscow Exile Ship Secretary (11th class)

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    Well there's a curious thing: as far as I am aware, to become a Russian citizen I should have to renounce my British citizenship.

    So how come my children have dual-nationality?

    The fact is that I still don't know whether they do, in fact, have dual nationality as far as the Russian law is concerned. By British law, they all automatically became British citizens at birth because of the British nationality of one of their parents. However, when my eldest child was born, I had to quickly decide whether to register his birth at the local Russian registrar, which meant registering him as a Russian citizen, or registering him at the British consulate. To register him as a Russian citizen, I, as a foreign father, was obliged to make a statement that I was not opposed to his becoming a Russian citizen and there was at that time (1999) most definitely no agreement between the UK and the RF as regards dual nationality. If I had registered him as a British citizen, he would have needed a visa as well, which would have had to be renewed every year.

    The British consul advised me to register his birth with the local Russian registrar and then bring his Russian birth certificate to the British consulate and register him there.

    When, one year later, after my son had received his British passport, we took him to show him the folks back home, my wife was given a document by the British consulate that declared my son's permanent entitlement to residency in the UK. His name and date of birth had, of course, already been registered in my wife's Russian passport when we registered his birth and when we passed through the control at Sheremet'evo this certificate of entitlement served as a visa for his entry into the UK.

    We were advised not to present his British passport at Sheremet'evo as we were told that the authorities might try to confiscate it - I presume because in their eyes it was a false document. (In fact, this once happened to an Irish colleague of mine.) Upon our arrival, my son and I passed straight through passport control at Heathrow using our British passports. We then had to wait for a long time for my wife, who, as usual, was getting the third degree off the ever alert whenever it comes to Russian citizens British immigration officers. On our return to Russia, my son entered his mother's mother country by means of his registration in his mother's Russian passport.

    This whole crazy rigmarole was repeated a year later with our second child, who was born on Christmas Day 2000.

    However,when we were taking our third child, born in 2008, to the UK, I asked the British consulate employee who gave me our youngest child's British passport whether I should still avoid letting the Russian passport control see her British passport; the consulate employee just said "Oh, all that business is over and finished with now."

    Now, whenever we travel around as a family we have eight passports and one residency permit on our persons: my wife and three children's Russian passports; my own and my children's British passports; and my Russian residency permit.

    But I still think that officially my children are Russian citizens and Russian citizens only according to Russian law, for why else should I have renounce my British citizenship if I wished to become a Russian citizen?
  4. Hero of Crappy Town

    Hero of Crappy Town Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    Interesting. So Russia doesn't allow for dual citizenship, at least not with Britain.

    Well that bit is true even for, at least some, states which do anticipate the possibility of dual citizenship. If you are a citizen of Serbia for example you are expected to present yourself to their authorities with documents issued by them, regardless of documents of what other states you may posses in addition to theirs.
  5. Moscow Exile

    Moscow Exile Ship Secretary (11th class)

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    This site is unclear as regards whether there exists dual Anglo-Russian citizenship:

    "The provisions of the Russian Federation Nationality Act also allowed individuals to become Russian citizens through naturalization if they were permanent residents in Russia for at least five years, not in breach of Russia’s laws, had a legal source of income, applied to renounce their current citizenship (though dual citizenship is permitted and could be maintained) and communicated effectively in the Russian language. Some of these requirements may be waived in certain instances by the discretionary power of the competent authority" whereas this site categorically states that it is possible to have dual Anglo-Russian citizenship.

    Searching the web one can find many statements off persons stating that they have dual Russian/British citizenship, yet I still find it strange that if I should wish to apply for Russian citizenship I am told (above and elsewhere) that I should renounce my current citizenship "though dual citizenship is permitted and could be maintained".

    So why is one told one has to renounce one's citizenship but in the same breath is told that "dual citizenship is permitted and could be maintained"?


    This was the position when my son was born in 1999:

    "Officially, Russia acknowledges dual citizenship only with countries with which it has agreements. Russia has an agreement on dual citizenship with only one country, and the official was unsure if this is Tajikistan or Uzbekistan."

    (See: Russia: Information whether Russia allows dual citizenship ... )

    So what's happened since then?

    I often get the feeling that Russians are not in the habit of repealing laws, they just ignore them, but they're still there, on the shelf as it were; and if they should need them, then they're taken down from the shelf, have the dust blown off them and are applied.
  6. Moscow Exile

    Moscow Exile Ship Secretary (11th class)

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    Why, as a condition of becoming a naturalized Russian citizen, is it stated above that one has to renounce one's current citizenship, yet, in the same sentence quoted above, it is stated that "dual citizenship is permitted and could be maintained"? (My emphasis: subjunctive mood of the modal auxiliary verb "can" indicating hypothetical possibility.)

    Can one or can one not be granted dual citizenship, and if so, then why, in order to apply for naturalization, is it a condition that one renounce one's current citizenship?

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