Exactly who benefits?

Discussion in 'The Russian Economy' started by PCO VolgaTrader, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. PCO VolgaTrader

    PCO VolgaTrader Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    See the link below. This seems to be another example of Russia cutting off its nose to spite its face.

    Russia is leaving the TIR convention which allows trucks to travel internationally. The PR reason is one particular accident discussed in the link. There seems to be an underlying political conflict with Lithuania as well. Owners and drivers of Russian truck tractors will benefit hugely. However, there is no evidence that they will be safer, indeed, given the age and condition of Russia trucks, the opposite is likely. Meanwhile, all Russian consumers will have to pay higher prices. Is this worth it to be spiteful to Lithuania? Consider recent attempts to strong arm Ukraine and Armenia from closer links with the EU. Are such actions the path to long term cooperation? Are the middle levels of Russian government full of idiot nationalists? Who put them there?

    Russia has full employment. Where will the new drivers come from?

    Road safety is a concern in Russia. Have other readers noticed the disappearance of the Mashrutki? Those that survive are increasingly imported Mercedes minibuses rather than Gazelles.

    Russia actually needs better vehicle and driver licensing systems and a test program to remove dangerous vehicles from the roads.

    http://www.russiasupplychain.com/wh...8420.gde_3788420_member_5792964165589032961#!
  2. SWSpires

    SWSpires Gubernial Secretary (12th class)

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    Do other countries have such a law (no foreign licenses)? Off the top of my head, I can't think of any.

    The main potential sore point re Lithuania, as far as I know, is that it stands between "big" Russia and Kaliningrad. Therefore the potential for strained relations is pretty high.
  3. PCO VolgaTrader

    PCO VolgaTrader Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    Also, Riga is the nearest modern port to Moscow, so a very large proportion of goods sensitive to customs blockages comes through Riga (they can be cleared at Riga - if refused it is easier to extract them). Of course, Lithuanian drivers get most of the work driving the lorries. Russian bureaucrats seem to have an automatic response that Russian producer interests are the same as the national interest. (30 years ago most "Westerners" thought the same, many Americans still do). Hence the withdrawal from the TIR convention, an imposition of cost on every Russian household. This will pass. Russia seems to be sabre rattling at the EU. Not a great way to obtain cooperation.

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