Breakthrough for Russian diplomacy on Syria

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by Robert, May 9, 2013.

  1. Robert

    Robert Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    http://vineyardsaker.blogspot.com/2013/05/a-small-but-victorious-skirmish-in-much.html

  2. Vostok

    Vostok Gubernial Secretary (12th class)

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    Good read, thank you for sharing. What do you think will happen now? The Ba'ath Party Command makes the final decision on such matters and not Assad. It will never agree to a coalition government with Islamists. If there is one thing they hate more than Communists, it's Islamists.
  3. Robert

    Robert Collegiate Registrar (14th class)

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    That's a huge problem. I think the principle of equal rights for all Syrians regardless of race or religion is the key. The army could make it clear to any coalition government including Islamists that any attempt to interfere with the rights of citizens under the constitution will not be tolerated. I don't think the major of Syrian Sunnis want fundamentalist Wahabism of a Saudi type imposed on them. Syria is just not that sort of society at least not yet.
  4. Sevan

    Sevan Citizen

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    The army is largely loyal to the Ba'ath party and especially the Assad family. Bashar's father Hafez was a military man through and through and he used his repertoire with the military to achieve power in Syria (he was defence minister and the military gave their allegiance to him and not the president during the infamous coup).

    Many remnants of the old guard still exist in the military and if not themselves but through the younger generations. The military is closely linked with the current Presidency and the party mechanism. It's a different case to say Egypt where the military was largely independent even if it did have a few Mubarak supporters.

    I don't know how the middle ground will be established or who will broker it. The hate between the state and the muslim brotherhood goes back a long time.
    Vostok likes this.

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